Close

Member Login

Logging In
Invalid username or password.
Incorrect Login. Please try again.

What is the NASTAR community?

Welcome to our new and improved site. Here, you can interact with other racers on the forum, post your own photos and stories, and read the latest news on racing, skiing, resorts, family activities, and gear. Log in to join the conversation.

Why do I need two logins?

You might have noticed that our site has changed. We've added a new and improved forum, a photo section where you can share your own photos, and ski tips, travel ideas, and more to keep your racing improving. To be a part of the community you'll need to register and create an account. We encourage all NASTAR members to use their NASTAR Registration Number and password when they create their NASTAR community log in to simplify their experience.

To log in to your NASTAR Racing record click here.

3 Winning Fixes for Skis and Bindings

3 Winning Fixes for Skis and Bindings

It’s almost March and NASTAR Nationals time at Steamboat. No matter how well you’ve raced this season, your equipment has taken a beating. But instead of letting it slide into Steamboat, you can examine and adjust your gear in just a few minutes — saving you precious seconds on the racecourse.
Nastar.com
Your skis can probably go faster.

By Jim Schaffner

It’s almost March and NASTAR Nationals time at Steamboat. No matter how well you’ve raced this season, your equipment has taken a beating. But instead of letting it slide into Steamboat, you can examine and adjust your gear in just a few minutes — saving you precious seconds on the racecourse.

Here’s where you might be losing speed, and how you can get it back.

1. Skis That Have Simply Lost Their Grip

You know the type. They simply can’t hold in hard or icy conditions. This might be from training or racing too much on challenging snow, or from messing with the skis yourself. Aggressive tools on the base can do as much damage as Mother Nature’s curveballs.

Either way, the base and edge have compromised the grip — and there’s no telling exactly when this might happen. But once you note the change, the quick fix is to get the base and base edge reground at a shop with a high-quality stone grinder and a highly trained tech.

If you’re very skilled with hand tools — sharp metal scrapers, sandpaper, Fibertex — then you can clean up the base and edges on your own, in between stone grinds. Keep in mind that your skis can handle only so many grinds before the base material starts to wear thin, which means less surface area to hold wax and protect the ski.

2. Skis That Need to Be Engaged More

When the bottom shape of skis changes and becomes rounder, you’ll feel you need more edge angle to get engaged. The best fix is to keep your tools away from the base edge, and focus instead on side edge for sharpness. (As you file more side edge throughout the season, you may need to pull away more sidewall material so that your side edge angle also remains true.)

3. Bindings That Haven’t Met Their Match

In other words, your skill level may have changed during the season, along with your weight, speed, technique and tactics. So you may need to change your binding setting accordingly.

First, ensure that the forward pressure on the heelpiece is adjusted properly to the boot. Err on the side of more forward pressure than less. Check for snow or ice stuck on the boot sole that might be preventing the binding from working properly. And if the binding toe piece has either a toe height adjustment or mechanical wing adjustments, those both must be perfectly calibrated, as well.

The secret to success: Always adjust bindings on snow, when the boots and bindings have acclimated to outside temperatures.

Remember the ski boot. If you see anything that looks suspicious, such as excessive wear of the sole, any cuts or chunks of plastic missing where the boot sole contacts the binding should be repaired.

If the boots were canted and lifted, make sure that the soles are restored to the proper DIN specs. Boots that have been lifted or plated can always have cracked, worn, or broken pieces replaced. (This is also a good place to remind you protect your boot sole from wear by using Cat Tracks, or Ski Skooties.)

5 Good Habits For Ski Maintenance

1. Dry and inspect the skis every time you use them. Look for damage, wear, and edge sharpness.
2. Do light maintenance every day. Try to wax every time you ski.
3. Always use ski straps to transport your skis. Use a minimum of two straps, tip and tail, for car and for carrying; and three or four straps when rolling skis in a bag and flying.
4. Keep wax on the skis as often as you can. Any time that you are storing the skis, leave a coat of mid temp hydrocarbon wax.
5. Try to use the least aggressive tools so that the edges last as long as possible. When it’s time for heavy edge work, move to the quickest and most efficient method to re-sharpen, whether that’s a Trione, SnowGlide, a file or a diamond stone.

3 Good Habits For Binding Maintenance

1. Check the forward pressure on your heel piece when outside on the snow when your boot and the binding are at outside temps.
2. Visually inspect the bindings when you put the skis in the vise for prep. Check for any broken or missing parts.
3. Always know what your DIN settings are for all events, and for training versus racing.

Find more expertise on equipment from Jim Schaffner in the Premium section of SkiRacing.com.